Why Everyone Should Add Sports into their Lives

In the many conversations I’ve had with parents growing up as a competitive junior golf, the most common question is, “why continue playing golf?” Some family friends thought that if I diverted all the time and energy that I spent on golf towards my schoolbooks, I would finish top of my class and open up more opportunities for the future. This is the mentality that most people in Asia have towards education, but there is so much more to a child’s development than academia. I am not saying that school is not important – I was a straight A student – but I believe golf was the reason I scored good grades. Sport teaches us values that are not as evidently taught in the classroom: time management, teamwork, and collaboration; the list is endless.

First, playing sports fosters good time management skills – in order to excel in both sport and academics, athletes learn at a your age to how to balance their responsibilities, set priorities, and be productive with their time.

Second, sport teaches the importance of teamwork, regardless if the sport is of an individual nature like golf or tennis. Every athlete needs to build a strong team around them that they can trust and work well together in order to elevate their game to the next level.

Third, collaboration; in sport, we learn that there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach to improvement – athletes have to constantly seek new ideas from different sources, which molds them into coachable individuals who can easily adapt to different styles of learning.

Lastly, in addition to these values that sport instills, it also opens the door to many opportunities. Athletes can leverage their successes in their sport to get a university education in the U.S., and the values that they learn in their early years with sport make athletes highly sought after in the workplace.

This is why I think everyone should add sports into their lives – you never know what may become of it. Best-case scenario, you become a decorated athlete and earn millions in prize money and endorsements. Worst-case, you grow into a driven individual who understands the importance of teamwork, dedication, and is adaptable to any situation. That’s a pretty good “worst-case” in my opinion. So regardless of whether you are the next Olympic gold medalist, or an athlete representing your school, remember to #DreamBig.

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